Workout for a Boxer

Health & Fitness

What is so special about working out like a boxer? It has got to do with the strain in practice which is perhaps the highest in any field of sport. It also requires that different faculties, both physical and mental be always in peak physical shape. This includes all round development of strength, flexibility and reflexes. In short, a good boxer must be supremely fit in more ways than one. It is therefore natural that the work out of a boxer is finetuned with precision if he has to outdo his opponents in the ring. And this is no mean task. One hour of a boxer’s workout burns about 600 calories per hour. So as part of the daily routine, it is not the workout only that has to be in focus, a lot of external backup and supplements should form the core of the workout routine.

One of the first questions that come up in relation to a boxer’s workout is how long should a boxer train. Though it depends purely on fitness and individual fitness levels, an ideal routine will be a judicious mix of 3 to 5 hours per day for about 5 times a week. It will be a combination of warm-up for 30 minutes, roadwork for 30 to 60 mins, skill settings, bag work and sparring for 30 mins each, strength and conditioning for 60 mins and finally the crunches and warm down for 30 mins. It is not necessarily in this order. For example, roadwork is best avoided during noon when the sun is at its hottest and should be slotted for the beginning or end of day. Exceptions can be made to this routine. It all rests on the endurance limits of an individual.

A crucial part of a boxer’s workout is the sharpening of reflexes for the jab, cross, jab, bob and weave routine. This is the lifeblood of any boxer and prepares him to be in a position where he is not left flat footed in front of a rival. While following this routine, speed is of essence. However, not everybody can be a Mick Fabar. This legendary Australian businessman and builder entered the Guinness Book of World Records with 436 punches in a minute and broke it later with 548 soon after. Another of his records was 302 left punches in a minute.

While it is true that in competition it is not only speed that matters, it surely plays an important part in deciding the final winner. The routine that has to be followed in this workout includes throwing punches, swivelling around the waist, bringing arms up to guard and finally bobbing and weaving from left to right. The set has to be repeated and is a simulation of what needs to be done when facing an opponent in the ring.

Finally, it is the endurance level that is often the fine dividing line that separates a winner from a loser. There are many avenues to increase staying power. The first is to optimise cardio exercises that increases the heart rate and by default oxygen intake. Running, swimming, skipping rope, biking should definitely be a part of a boxer’s daily regimen. Muscle conditioning to increase speed of punches and generate adequate power is vital. And the muscles should be so conditioned to absorb repeated battering from an opponent.

Follow this workout for a boxer and you cannot possibly go wrong.